Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/90580
Authors: 
Noe, Dominik
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 140
Abstract: 
This study empirically investigates the impact of group characteristics and host country conditions on the duration and the ending of terrorist organizations and rebel groups. The empirical analysis relies on data for more than 600 armed groups from the Terrorist Organization Profiles, collected by the MIPT, and employs discrete time duration models with unobserved heterogeneity and its application to a setting with competing risks. It is found that organizations stabilize over time and face the highest risk of failure at the beginning. Factors that motivate members play an important role, as does support from other countries. Rich states are more likely to defeat armed groups and there is no evidence found that a restriction of civil rights decreases the duration of armed groups or increases the likelihood of capturing them.
Subjects: 
Terrorist organizations
Insurgency
Duration analysis
Discrete time duration model
Competing risk regression
Civil war
JEL: 
H56
D74
H39
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.