Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/90567
Authors: 
Günther, Isabel
Harttgen, Kenneth
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 52
Abstract: 
In this paper we analyze if an `urban mortality penalty\' exists for today\'s developing countries, repeating the history of industrialized nations during the 19th century. We analyze the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) of 19 Sub-Saharan African countries for differences in child and adult mortality between rural and urban areas. Our findings indicate that child mortality is higher in rural areas for almost all countries. On average child mortality rates are 13.6 percent in rural areas and `only\' 10.8 percent in urban areas. In contrast, average urban adult mortality rates (on average 14.5 percent) have indeed exceeded rural adult mortality rates (on average 12.8 percent) in many of our sample countries in the 2000s. For many countries high child mortality pockets do, however, exist in slum areas within cities. Child mortality rates in slum areas are on average 1.65 times higher than in the formal settlements of cities, but still lower than in rural areas.
Subjects: 
mortality
urban
slum
inequality
JEL: 
I10
I30
J10
R00
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.