Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/90106
Authors: 
Bertoni, Marco
Brunello, Giorgio
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Paper 7679
Abstract: 
While it is well known that birth order affects educational attainment, less is known about its effects on earnings. Using data from eleven European countries for males born between 1935 and 1956, we show that firstborns enjoy on average a 13.7 percent premium over laterborns in their wage at labour market entry. However, this advantage is short lived, and disappears by age 30, between 10 and 15 years after labour market entry. While firstborns start with a better match, partly because of their higher education, laterborns quickly catch up by switching earlier and more frequently to better paying jobs. We argue that a key factor driving our findings is that laterborns are more likely to engage in risky behaviours.
Subjects: 
birth order
earnings
risk aversion
Europe
JEL: 
D13
J12
J24
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
290.49 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.