Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/90035
Authors: 
Coibion, Olivier
Gorodnichenko, Yuriy
Koustas, Dmitri
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Paper 7715
Abstract: 
The persistence of U.S. unemployment has risen with each of the last three recessions, raising the specter that future U.S. recessions might look more like the Eurosclerosis experience of the 1980s than traditional V-shaped recoveries of the past. In this paper, we revisit possible explanations for this rising persistence. First, we argue that financial shocks do not systematically lead to more persistent unemployment than monetary policy shocks, so these cannot explain the rising persistence of unemployment. Second, monetary and fiscal policies can account for only part of the evolving unemployment persistence. Therefore, we turn to a third class of explanations: propagation mechanisms. We focus on factors consistent with four other cyclical patterns which have evolved since the early 1980s: a rising cyclicality in long-term unemployment, lower regional convergence after downturns, rising cyclicality in disability claims, and missing disinflation. These factors include declining labor mobility, changing age structures, and the decline in trust among Americans. To determine how these factors affect unemployment persistence, this paper exploits regional variation in labor market outcomes across Western Europe and North America during 1970-1990, in contrast to most previous work focusing either on cross-country variation or regional variation within countries. The results suggest that only cultural factors can account for the rising persistence of unemployment in the U.S., but the evolution in mobility and demographics over time should have more than offset the effects of culture.
Subjects: 
unemployment persistence
labor mobility
trust
demographics
JEL: 
E24
E32
E52
J64
R11
R23
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.24 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.