Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/89939
Authors: 
Winters, John V.
Xu, Weineng
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Paper 7584
Abstract: 
Economics has been shown to be a relatively high earning college major, but geographic differences in earnings have been largely overlooked. This paper uses the American Community Survey to examine geographic differences in both absolute earnings and relative earnings for economic majors. We find that there are substantial geographic differences in both the absolute and relative earnings of economics majors even controlling for individual characteristics such as age and advanced degrees. We argue that mean earnings in specific labor markets are a better measure of the benefits of majoring in economics than simply looking at national averages.
Subjects: 
economics major
earnings differentials
college education
local labor markets
JEL: 
I23
J24
J31
R23
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
594.61 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.