Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/89454
Authors: 
Nelson, Richard R.
Year of Publication: 
2003
Series/Report no.: 
LEM Working Paper Series 2003/24
Abstract: 
It is widely believed that while society allows technology to be private property, scientific knowledge is public and open. However, over the past quarter-century there has been increasing patenting of quite basic scientific knowledge. This essay argues that this is potentially a very serious problem. The future development of technology, as well as the future progress of science, is greatly facilitated when basic scientific knowledge is public and open. The paper explores the various factors that have led to the growing privatization of scientific knowledge. And it explores a variety of policy changes that can stop, and even reverse, these trends.
Subjects: 
Science
Technology
Patents
Open Knowledge
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.