Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/89398
Authors: 
Winter, Sidney G.
Year of Publication: 
2004
Series/Report no.: 
LEM Working Paper Series 2004/20
Abstract: 
This paper offers a sketch of what an economic theory of the firm would look like if it were founded on the thought of Joseph Schumpeter, particularly on Chapters 1-2 of his Theory of Economic Development. Schumpeterian analysis requires an intuitively appealing and realistic conceptualization of the distinction between routine and innovative behavior, and in particular, a conceptualization relevant to complex organizations and complex tasks. It is argued that the production theory found in mainstream economics does not meet this requirement, particularly because its characterization of productive knowledge involves an overly sharp distinction between technically possible and technically impossible a distinction which has no counterpart in the realities of organizational knowledge. The main elements of a Schumpeterian view are described and contrasted with those in the mainstream view.
Subjects: 
theory of the firm
Schumpeter
innovation
knowledge
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.