Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/89111
Authors: 
Panadeiros, Monica
Benfield, Warren
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
IDB Working Paper Series IDB-WP-128
Abstract: 
Jamaica seems to be a puzzling case for economic growth: despite the structural reforms implemented in the last three decades and adequate investment levels, real GDP per capita is roughly the same as in 1970. The disappointing performance of this economy suggests that productive development policies (PDPs), including first-generation reforms, have not been enough to create a better environment for productivity growth. This paper examines the PDPs in Jamaica and concludes that behind the paradox of high investment and low growth of this economy are the “public debt trap” and a highly distortive tax incentive structure to attract foreign direct investment (FDI) and promote exports. Although industrial policy is moving towards a more modern conceptual design, the old schemes seem politically difficult to dismantle.
Subjects: 
Productivity
Industrial policy
Foreign direct Investment
Jamaica
JEL: 
L52
O25
O54
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
429.93 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.