Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/89047
Authors: 
Powers, Elizabeth
Year of Publication: 
2011
Series/Report no.: 
IDB Working Paper Series IDB-WP-246
Abstract: 
This paper uses data from the Mexican Family Life Survey to estimate the impact of a household member’s migration to the United States on the cognitive development of children remaining in Mexico. While there is no developmental effect of a child’s sibling migrating to the United States, there is an adverse effect when another household member—typically the child’s parent—migrates. This is particularly true for pre-school to early-school-age children with older siblings, for whom the effect of parental migration is comparable to speaking an indigenous language at home or having a mother with very low educational attainment. Additionally, household-member migration to the United States affects how children spend their time in ways that may influence and/or be influenced by cognitive development.
JEL: 
I12
I38
J11
J61
O15
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
488.12 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.