Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/88260
Authors: 
Baum, Chad M.
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
Papers on Economics and Evolution 1303
Abstract: 
The greater awareness of the negative environmental and health-related externalities of the large-scale food industry is directly responsible for the diminished confidence of the quality of its products. Using the multi-level perspective on socio-technical transitions (Geels, 2004; 2010), I argue that the initial impetus for the emergence of mass production was the presence of threats to health and safety in the broader societal context. Rather than simply serving economic considerations, the scale and scientific expertise of mass production functioned as a credible signal due to its relationship to these threats. The declining health and safety of the food industry represents, however, a consequence of the changing relationship of scale and quality due to the emergence of new threats to health and safety. Scale as a signal of credibility is no longer sufficient to guarantee these qualities, however. Absent the incentives to undertake costly investments in quality production, the criteria of productivity and efficiency become duly emphasized to the detriment of health and safety. Hence, the continued emphasis on scale now represents a limitation to improving health and safety. Instead, further quality innovation demands the development of a costly signal appropriate to the extant social context.
Subjects: 
socio-technical transitions
health and safety of the food industry
mass production
credibility
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
294.21 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.