Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/88246
Authors: 
Witt, Ulrich
Schwesinger, Georg
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
Papers on Economics and Evolution 1217
Abstract: 
An evolutionary tool kit is applied in this paper to explain how innate social behavior traits evolved in early human groups. These traits were adapted to the particular production requirements of the group in human phylogeny. They shaped the group members' attitudes towards contributing to the group's goals and towards other group members. We argue that these attitudes are still present in modern humans and leave their phylogenetic footprints also in present-day organizational life. We discuss the implications of this hypothesis for problems arising in firm organizations in relation to the coordination and motivation of organization members.
Subjects: 
evolution
pre-adaptations
group selection
firm organization
organizational behavior
leadership
JEL: 
B25
D03
D23
D74
M14
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
222.57 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.