Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/88239
Authors: 
Buenstorf, Guido
Klepper, Steven
Year of Publication: 
2004
Series/Report no.: 
Papers on Economics and Evolution 0407
Abstract: 
During its early and formative years, the U.S. tire industry was heavily concentrated around Akron, Ohio. We test the extent to which entrants in Ohio were attracted to the Akron area by agglomeration benefits, contributing to a self-reinforcing process envisioned in many modern theories of geography. We trace the geographic and intellectual heritage of the Ohio entrants and analyze the factors underlying their creation and location at the county level. Our findings suggest it was the creation of entrants, largely spurred by the supply of entrepreneurs, and not the attraction of entrants to the Akron area that fueled the agglomeration of the industry there.
Subjects: 
Entry
Location
Agglomerations
Spinoffs
JEL: 
L65
R12
R39
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
393.29 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.