Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/88058
Authors: 
Fernández-Arias, Eduardo
Hausmann, Ricardo
Year of Publication: 
2000
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department 416
Abstract: 
It has been common to attribute financial crises to short-term capital inflows, while foreign direct investment (FDI) is seen as a safer form of finance. The relationship between crises and the composition of capital flows is particularly relevant at present because the flow of capital to Latin America is becoming increasingly dominated by FDI. This paper asks whether the composition of capital inflows and of the stock of foreign liabilities is relevant for financial crises, be it their frequency, depth, or length. It explores the possible role of FDI as a benign form of external liability relative to other classes of liabilities, reviewing both analytical and empirical arguments.
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.