Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/87851
Authors: 
Hausmann, Ricardo
Gavin, Michael
Pagés-Serra, Carmen
Stein, Ernesto H.
Year of Publication: 
1999
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Inter-American Development Bank, Office of the Chief Economist 400
Abstract: 
Financial turmoil is becoming a fact of life in Latin America. The 1990s have been characterized by enormous volatility in the magnitude and cost of capital flows. The correlation of capital swings across disparate countries suggests that the quality of emerging market policies in addition to global factors have been the main actors in this drama. Therefore, the blame for financial turmoil has moved away from inappropriate domestic policies. Instead, the paradigm has shifted to one of determining which policies ¾ domestic or international¾ are most effective in taming the destabilizing effects of inherently volatile capital flows.
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
138.67 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.