Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/87056
Authors: 
Smit, Martijn J.
Abreu, Maria A.
de Groot, Henri L.F.
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper 10-060/3
Abstract: 
This paper employs firm-level data to analyze the relative importance of firm characteristics and agglomeration externalities in explaining variation in innovation rates across firms. More specifically, we combine micro-data and census data to estimate the probability that a firm will introduce a goods, service or process innovation. We consider internal firm-level characteristics as well as externalities, using information on the regional production structure to test for Marshall-Arrow-Romer, Porter and Jacobs effects. Our results show that most firm-specific variables are highly statistically significant, whereas agglomeration variables are only significant for a few specific sectors, and even then only for some types of innovation.
Subjects: 
innovation
absorptive capacity
agglomeration externalities
Community Innovation Survey
micro-data
firm behavior
JEL: 
L20
O30
R11
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
394.32 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.