Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/86979
Authors: 
Phlippen, Sandra
Vermeersch, An
Year of Publication: 
2008
Series/Report no.: 
Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper 08-022/3
Abstract: 
This study analyses 1400 research projects of the top 20 R&D-spending pharmaceuticals to identify the determinants of successful research projects. We provide clear evidence that externally sourced projects and projects involving biotechnologies perform better than internal projects and chemical projects, respectively. Controlling for these effects, we find that big pharma should either build a critical mass of disease area knowledge or diversify projects over different DA’s in order to obtain higher success probabilities. Projects in which a firm has built a critical mass of disease knowledge (through at least 10 projects per DA) are significantly more likely to reach clinical testing. Moreover, within large disease areas, the success probabilities of internal projects increases when a few (less than 20%) externally sourced projects are involved. We interpret this finding as knowledge spillovers from external to internal projects, as the limited number of external projects enables the same people to be involved in both external and internal research projects and apply externally generated knowledge internally.
Subjects: 
research strategies
pharmaceutical industry
innovation
external collaborations
make-or-buy
JEL: 
L65
L25
L21
D21
D83
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
583.49 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.