Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/86850
Authors: 
den Butter, Frank A.G.
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper 10-052/3
Abstract: 
In the analysis of the credit crisis of 2007-2010 a clear distinction should be made between (i) the initial shock; (ii) the propagation and amplification of the initial shock to the systemic crisis of the financial markets; and (iii) the transmission of the credit crisis to the real economic sector causing a major cyclical downturn now known as the great recession. This paper argues that banking supervision failed to anticipate and repair the market failure that caused the huge amplification of the relatively small initial shock. As the repair of market failure is the only sound economic argument for regulation, banking supervisors should now focus on the externalities that caused the amplification of the shock and use that knowledge for adequate macro-prudential supervision in the future. Macro-economic models can be helpful in this search for externalities. The character and timing of future shocks are unpredictable, but contagion in the propagation mechanisms should be mitigated as much as possible.
Subjects: 
credit crisis
externalities
macro-prudential supervision
contagion
fallacy of composition
JEL: 
E42
E58
G38
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
212.38 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.