Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/86440
Authors: 
van Dalen, Hendrik P.
Klamer, Arjo
Year of Publication: 
2005
Series/Report no.: 
Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper 05-005/1
Abstract: 
Science is a winner-take-all profession in which only few contributions get excessive attention and the large majority of papers_new remains receives scant or no attention. This so-called ‘waste’ together with all the competitive strategies of scientists seeking attention is part and parcel of any creative profession and not a worrisome fact as the price society pays for human ingenuity is extremely small: 0.0006 percent of world income goes into the publication of scientific research. The more worrisome features of competition in academic economics reveal themselves not through ordinary citation or publication statistics or competitive attention seeking strategies. The badly designed use of market principles in which citations and publications have become the sole measuring rod of scientific ‘productivity’ deserve more attention instead of the excessive focus of attention on uncitedness as such.
Subjects: 
economic science
public good
citations
wasteful competition
JEL: 
A14
H4
O34
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
179.91 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.