Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/86401
Authors: 
Ben-Shakhar, Gershon
Bornstein, Gary
Hopfensitz, Astrid
van Winden, Frans
Year of Publication: 
2004
Series/Report no.: 
Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper 04-099/1
Abstract: 
Although reciprocity is a key concept in the social sciences, it is still unclear why people engage in costly reciprocation. In this study, physiological and self-report measures were employed to investigate the role of emotions, using the Power-to-Take Game. In this 2-person game, player 1 can claim any part of player 2's resources, and player 2 can react by destroying some (or all) of these resources thus preventing their transfer to player 1. Both physiological and self-report measures were related to destruction decisions and expectations. The pattern of emotional arousal and its correlation with self-reported anger highlights the importance of using both techniques for studying reciprocity.
Subjects: 
emotions
bargaining
laboratory experiment
expectations
reciprocity
physiological arousal
self-report measures of emotions
JEL: 
A12
C72
C91
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
287.9 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.