Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/86391
Authors: 
Rodenburg, Peter
Year of Publication: 
2004
Series/Report no.: 
Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper 04-108/1
Abstract: 
The establishment of appropriate policy measures for fighting unemployment has always been difficult since causes of unemployment are hard to identify. This paper analyses an approach used mainly in the 1960s and 1970s in economics, in which classification is used as a way to deal with such a complex, multiple causal phenomenon like unemployment. The method is based on decomposing unemployment into classes of unemployment and the measurement of each of these classes by reference to stable, measurable macroeconomic relationships like the Phillips curve and the Beveridge curve. In this way economists were able to ‘diagnose’ unemployment and make policy recommendations for fighting unemployment without making explicit reference to the underlying singular causes of unemployment.
Subjects: 
Classification of unemployment
Causality
Theories of unemployment
Phillips curve
Beveridge curve
Economic policy measures
JEL: 
B
E
J
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
377.24 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.