Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/86375
Authors: 
Heukelom, Floris
Year of Publication: 
2005
Series/Report no.: 
Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper 05-111/2
Abstract: 
The origin of prospect theory is the desire to test the intuitive statistician in the real world. The development of this theory by the cognitive psychologists Kahneman and Tversky can be traced to the former's work in cognitive psychophysics, in which deviations from average behavior are termed (statistical) errors; and the latter's work on decision theory, with its normative vs. descriptive framework. The combination of these two types of probabilistic psychology culminated in a new descriptive theory of human decision making in the real world, coined Heuristics and Biases. The 1979 Econometrica article applies this new descriptive theory to economists' EUT. It equates the intuitive statistician with the rational economic man and shows how it descriptively fails.
Subjects: 
Kahneman and Tversky
Prospect Theory
Intuitive Statistician
Heuristics and Biases
JEL: 
B31
B41
D01
D81
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
152.66 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.