Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/86217
Authors: 
van Dalen, Hendrik P.
Henkens, Kène
Year of Publication: 
2004
Series/Report no.: 
Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper 04-113/1
Abstract: 
Which signals are important in gaining attention in science? For a group of 1,371 scientific articles published in 17 demography journals in the years 1990-1992 we track their influence and discern which signals are important in receiving citations. Three types of signals are examined: the author’s reputation (as producer of the idea), the journal (as the broker of the idea), and the state of uncitedness (as an indication of the assessment by the scientific community of an idea). The empirical analysis points out that, first, the reputation of journals plays an overriding role in gaining attention in science. Second, in contrast to common wisdom, the state of uncitedness does not affect the future probability of being cited. And third, the reputation of a journal may help to get late recognition (so-called ‘sleeping beauties’) as well as generate so-called ‘flash-in-the-pans’: immediately noted articles but apparently not very influential in the long run.
Subjects: 
signaling
duration dependence
journals
impact
citations
JEL: 
C41
D83
O31
O33
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
170.29 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.