Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/85899
Authors: 
van Dalen, Hendrik P.
Groenewold, George
Schoorl, Jeanette J.
Year of Publication: 
2003
Series/Report no.: 
Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper 03-059/3
Abstract: 
This paper evaluates the strength of social and economic forces that affect the pressure to emigrate 'out of Africa' for four distinctly different African countries (Morocco, Egypt, Senegal and Ghana). In general, great expectations about attaining a higher living standard and expected low job search costs abroad are strong forces that drive emigration intentions out of Africa, especially in Ghana and Senegal. Signs of positive selection with respect to the level of education of potential migrants are only present in Ghana and Egypt. The differences in intentions by age and sex are also quite noteworthy, although the influence of sex differs quite distinctly across countries. Return migrants are on average more set to emigrating judging from their stated intentions although there are signs of negative selection within the group of return migrants in Ghana and Egypt. The network effects of potential migrants turn out to be less important than one might expect from actual migration behaviour. Both ties within the household with household members who have international migration experience and ties with current migrants affect intentions only in Ghana and Egypt and it affects the intentions of women far stronger than that of men. The implication of these findings is that due to the slow growth prospects of these African countries the pressure to emigrate 'out of Africa' can be a long lasting phenomenon.
Subjects: 
migration
intentions
Africa
social networks.
JEL: 
F22
O52
P2
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
219.59 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.