Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/84657
Authors: 
Naudé, Wim
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
WIDER Discussion Papers, World Institute for Development Economics (UNU-WIDER) 2007/02
Abstract: 
Support for entrepreneurship is widely seen as a mechanism to facilitate prosperity and peace in a growing number of post-conflict states. In this paper I critically evaluate this view. I argue that entrepreneurship is a ubiquitous quality in post-conflict states but not necessarily always for the good. Unproductive and destructive entrepreneurship may inhibit the resurgence of the private sector and might even cause a relapse into conflict. To limit unproductive and destructive entrepreneurship there are at least six dimensions which need to be taken into consideration, namely: the context of war, the relationship between institutions and entrepreneurship, the role played by ethnic/immigrant (minority) entrepreneurs and entrepreneurs in diaspora, the scope of the market, human and financial capital requirements, and appropriate forms of government support. Further research on entrepreneurship in post-conflict states is needed to overcome the current lack of data, which constrains policy design.
Subjects: 
entrepreneurship
peace
security
reconstruction
development
JEL: 
M13
O12
D21
L25
ISBN: 
978-92-9190-991-9
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.