Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/83728
Authors: 
Vaughan, Daniel
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
Working Papers, Banco de México 2013-04
Abstract: 
I propose a model of cultural transmission where children interact strategically with each other with the only desire to fit in, and parents purposefully socialize their children to their own culture. In the empirical section I estimate parental and peer effects using US teenager data on religious attitudes and alcohol consumption from the Add Health study. I find that, controlling for individual and school observables, children attitudes are a weighted average of their parents' and peers' attitudes, with the latter generally dominating. I then show that these are stable in time with now signs of fading away in the transition from adolescence to adulthood. Finally, the comparative statics allow me to separate endogenous from exogenous parental effects.
Subjects: 
cultural transmission
endogenous preferences
add health study
preference for conformity
endogenous socialization
JEL: 
D19
J13
J15
Document Type: 
Working Paper
Appears in Collections:

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.