Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/82547
Authors: 
Gemus, Jonathan
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Department of Economics, Uppsala University 2010:20
Abstract: 
This paper examines the distributional impacts of direct college costs - that is, whether the response of educational decisions to college costs varies by student characteristics. The primary obstacle in estimating these effects is the endogeneity of schooling costs. To overcome this issue, I use two measures of direct costs that are plausibly exogenous: living within commuting distance to a university and the elimination of the Social Security Student Benefit Program in the United States. Both sources of variation indicate that lower ability students are the most responsive to changes in college costs. In contrast, I find that the effect of both cost measures on college attendance and graduation does not substantially vary by family income, parent education, race or gender.
Subjects: 
Schooling Costs
Educational Attainment
Financial Aid Policy
JEL: 
I20
I28
J24
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.