Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/82536
Authors: 
Rickne, Johanna
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Department of Economics, Uppsala University 2010:8
Abstract: 
This study compares average earnings and productivities for men and women employed in roughly 200,000 Chinese industrial enterprises. Women's average wages lag behind men's wages by 11%, and this result is robust to the inclusion of non-wage income in the form of social insurance payments. The gender-wage gap is wider among workers with more than 12 years of education (28%), mainly because of the higher relative wages received by skilled men in foreign-invested firms. Women's average productivity falls behind men's productivity by a larger margin than the gap in earnings, and the null-hypothesis of earnings discrimination is thereby rejected. Equal average wages between men and women are found among firms located in China's Special Economic Zones, and also among some light industrial sectors with high shares of female employees. Market reform hence appears to have improved women's relative incomes.
Subjects: 
China
gender wage gap
non-wage compensation
JEL: 
I30
J16
J71
O10
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
470.08 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.