Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/80778
Authors: 
Slive, Joshua
Witmer, Jonathan
Woodman, Elizabeth
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
Bank of Canada Working Paper 2012-38
Abstract: 
An international initiative to increase the use of central clearing for OTC derivatives emerged as one of the reactions to the 2008 financial crisis. The move to central clearing is a fundamental change in the structure of the market. Central clearing will help control counterparty credit risk, but it also has potential implications for market liquidity. We analyze the relationship between liquidity and central clearing using information on credit default swap clearing at ICE Trust and ICE Clear Europe. We find that the central counterparty chooses the most liquid contracts for central clearing, consistent with liquidity characteristics being important in determining the safety and efficiency of clearing. We further find that the introduction of central clearing is associated with a slight increase in the liquidity of a contract. This is consistent with two countervailing effects. On one hand, central clearing will likely increase collateral requirements relative to the pre-reform bilaterally-cleared market, thereby increasing clearing costs and possibly reducing the liquidity of the market. On the other hand, improved management of counterparty credit risk, increased transparency and operational efficiencies at central counterparties could bring more competition into OTC derivative markets and serve to increase liquidity.
Subjects: 
Financial markets
JEL: 
G30
G38
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
411.77 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.