Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/80742
Authors: 
Alquist, Ron
Guénette, Justin-Damien
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
Bank of Canada Working Paper 2013-23
Abstract: 
We examine the implications of increased unconventional crude oil production in North America. This production increase has been made possible by the existence of alternative oil-recovery technologies and persistently elevated oil prices that make these technologies commercially viable. We first discuss the factors that have enabled the United States to expand production so rapidly and the glut of oil inventory that has accumulated in the Midwest as result of logistical challenges and export restrictions. Next, we assess the extent to which the increase in U.S. domestic production will affect global supply conditions and whether the U.S. experience can be repeated in other countries with rich unconventional oil sources. The evidence suggests that even in the best-case scenario, the increase in U.S. production will not make a large contribution to global production, so its effect on the price of oil is expected to be limited. Furthermore, the United States enjoys unique infrastructural and technological advantages that make it unlikely that similarly rapid increases in unconventional production can be achieved elsewhere.
Subjects: 
International topics
Recent economic and financial developments
JEL: 
Q41
Q43
Q47
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
565.53 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.