Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/80669
Authors: 
Powdthavee, Nattavudh
Lekfuangfu, Warn N.
Wooden, Mark
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Paper 7365
Abstract: 
Many economists and educators favour public support for education on the premise that education improves the overall well-being of citizens. However, little is known about the causal pathways through which education shapes people's subjective well-being (SWB). This paper explores the direct and indirect well-being effects of extra schooling induced through compulsory schooling laws in Australia. We find the net effect of schooling on later SWB to be positive, though this effect is larger and statistically more robust for men than for women. We then show that the compulsory schooling effect on male's SWB is indirect and is mediated through income.
Subjects: 
schooling
indirect effect
well-being
mental health
windfall income
HILDA survey
JEL: 
I20
I32
C36
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
315.81 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.