Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/80549
Authors: 
Connelly, Rachel
Kimmel, Jean
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Paper 7531
Abstract: 
This paper considers the question posed by popular media, do women like doing child care more than men? Using experienced emotions data paired with 24 hour time diaries from the 2010 American Time Use Survey, the paper explores gender differences in how men and women who have done some child caregiving on the previous day feel when engaged in a set of common daily activities. We find that both men and women enjoy their time in child caregiving, men as much, or even more so, than women as evidenced by their average values for happiness, tiredness, and stress, their predicted values for the same three emotions and via an aggregated statistic, the unpleasantness index. Counter-factual unpleasantness indices provide evidence that difference between men and women come almost completely from differences in their experience emotions rather than from differences in how they use their time.
Subjects: 
time use
subjective well-being
child care
gender wage gap
experienced emotions
happiness
JEL: 
D13
J13
J16
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
212.93 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.