Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/80491
Authors: 
Carson, Scott A.
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
CESifo Working Paper 4366
Abstract: 
This study compares two US BMI data sets, one from the 1800s and the other from the early 2000s, to determine how black and white male obesity rates varied between 1800 and 2000. The proportion of individuals who were obese rather than overweight is responsible much of the increase in obesity. Because of their physical activity and close proximity to nutritious diets, farmers had greater BMI values than workers in other occupations; however, since the 19th century, physically less active white-collar and skilled workers have become more obese. Northeastern obesity rates are lower than from elsewhere within the US, while Midwestern BMIs increased and western BMIs decreased.
Subjects: 
BMIs
US obesity epidemic
long-term health
obesity by race
JEL: 
I10
I12
J11
J15
N30
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.