Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/80154
Authors: 
Putterman, Louis
Year of Publication: 
2006
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Brown University, Department of Economics 2006-19
Abstract: 
Are the Neolithic revolution’s effects still impacting incomes across the world today? I find strong support for this proposition using new, country-specific estimates of the timing of agricultural transition. While support with my data is slightly weaker than with the coarser data of Hibbs and Olsson (2004), I provide evidence that the differences are due to how technological diffusion is accounted for. A correction for world migrations since 1500 significantly improves the fit. Transition year also helps to explain income in 1500 itself, and an alternative measure of pre-modern development, state history, has similar ability to predict income in 1500 and 1997.
Subjects: 
economic growth
agriculture
transition to agriculture
Neolithic Revolution
JEL: 
N50
O10
O40
Q10
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
188.68 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.