Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/80105
Authors: 
Galor, Oded
Moav, Omer
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Brown University, Department of Economics 2007-14
Abstract: 
This research advances an evolutionary theory and provides empirical evidence that shed new light on the origins of contemporary differences in life expectancy across countries. The theory suggests that social, economic and environmental changes that were associated with the Neolithic Revolution affected the nature of the environmental hazards confronted by the human population, triggering an evolutionary process that had a significant impact on human longevity. The empirical analysis shows that a significant portion of contemporary variations in life expectancy across countries can be traced to the differences in the time passed since the ancestors of the population of each country experienced the Neolithic Revolution.
Subjects: 
Life Expectancy
Growth
Technological Progress
Evolution
Natural Selection
Malthusian Stagnation
JEL: 
I12
J13
N3
O10
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
346.95 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.