Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/80088
Authors: 
Grossman, Herschel I.
Mendoza, Juan
Year of Publication: 
2002
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Brown University, Department of Economics 2002-15
Abstract: 
This paper develops an economic theory of empire building. This theory addresses the choice among three strategies that empire builders historically have used. We call these strategies Uncoerced Annexation, Coerced Annexation, and Attempted Conquest. The theory yields hypotheses that relate the choice among these strategies to such factors as the economic gains from imperial expansion, the relative effectiveness of imperial armies, the costs of projecting imperial military power, and liquidity constraints on Þnancing imperial armies. This theory also yields hypotheses about the scope of imperial ambitions. The paper uses examples from the history of the Roman, Mongol, Ottoman, and Nazi German empires to illustrate the applicability of the theory. – Annexation ; Conquest ; Empire Building
JEL: 
D74
F02
N40
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
223.64 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.