Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Löffler, Max
Peichl, Andreas
Siegloch, Sebastian
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
Beiträge zur Jahrestagung des Vereins für Socialpolitik 2013: Wettbewerbspolitik und Regulierung in einer globalen Wirtschaftsordnung - Session: Labor Supply D17-V2
Although discrete hours choice models have become the workhorse in labor supply analyses. Yet, they are often criticized for being a black box due to their numerous underlying modeling assumptions, with respect to, e.g., the functional form, unobserved error components or several exogeneity assumptions. In this paper, we open the black box and show how these assumptions affect the statistical fit of the models and, more importantly, the estimated outcomes, i.e., estimated labor supply elasticities. In total we estimate 2,219 different model specifications. Our results show that the specification of the utility function is not crucial for performance and predictions of the model. We find however that the estimates are extremely sensitive to the treatment of the wages a neglected dimension so far. We show that, e.g., the choice between predicting wages for the full sample instead of using predicted wages only for non-workers two methods frequently used increases labor supply elasticities by up to 100 percent. As a consequence, we propose a new estimation strategy which overcomes the highly restrictive but commonly made assumption of independence between wages and the labor supply decision.
Document Type: 
Conference Paper

Files in This Item:

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.