Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Lohmann, Steffen
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Papers, Center for European Governance and Economic Development Research 169
This paper examines whether access to modern information technologies, in particular the internet, has an impact on invididual positionality - meaning the degree to which subjective well-being is affected by income relative to others rather than absolute income. We provide empirical evidence that positionality and internet access are intertwined. Exploiting variation over time in a panel of European households, we find stated material aspirations to be significantly positively related to computer access in areas with advanced internet infrastructure. Furthermore, we report cross-sectional evidence from the World Values Survey suggesting an indirect negative effect of internet access on subjective well-being since people who regularly use the internet as a source of information derive less satisfaction from income. Together, the empirical findings highlight the importance of information sets for how individuals evaluate own living conditions relative to others and suggests a vital role for informational globalisation to affect positionality.
subjective well-being
relative income
informational globalisation
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
627.66 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.