Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/79066
Authors: 
Mühlau, Peter
Year of Publication: 
2011
Citation: 
[Journal:] Management Revue [ISSN:] 1861-9916 [Publisher:] Hampp [Place:] Mering [Volume:] 22 [Year:] 2011 [Issue:] 2 [Pages:] 114-131
Abstract: 
In this paper, I examine whether and to which degree the quality of work and employment differs between men and women and how these gender differences are shaped by societal beliefs about 'gender equality.' Using data from the 2004 wave of the European Social Survey, I compare the jobs of men and women across a variety of measures of perceived job quality in 26 countries. Key findings are that job quality is gendered: Jobs of men are typically characterized by high training requirements, good promotion opportunities and high levels of job complexity, autonomy and participation. Jobs for women, in contrast, are less likely to pose a health or safety risk or to involve work during antisocial hours. However, contrary to expectation, the job profiles of men and women are not more similar in societies with gender egalitarian norms. While women are relatively more likely to be exposed to health and safety risks, work pressure and demands to work outside regular working time, in more gender- egalitarian societies their work is not, relative to men's, more skilled, complex or autonomous. Neither do more egalitarian societies provide more opportunities for participation and advancement for women than less egalitarian societies.
Subjects: 
job quality
gender inequality
gender egalitarianism
JEL: 
A14
J16
J24
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size
160.95 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.