Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/79040
Authors: 
Clark, Andrew E.
Year of Publication: 
2011
Citation: 
[Journal:] Management Revue [ISSN:] 1861-9916 [Publisher:] Hampp [Place:] Mering [Volume:] 22 [Year:] 2011 [Issue:] 1 [Pages:] 8-27
Abstract: 
The degree to which workers identify with their firms, and how hard they are willing to work for them, would seem to be key variables for the understanding of both firm productivity and individual labour-market outcomes. This paper uses repeated crosssection ISSP data from 1997 and 2005 to consider three of measures of worker commitment. There are enormous cross-country differences in these commitment measures, which are difficult to explain using individual- or job-related characteristics. These patterns do, however, correlate with some country-level variables. While unemployment and inflation are both associated with lower commitment to an extent, economic and civil liberties are positively correlated with worker effort and pride in the firm.
Subjects: 
commitment
reciprocity
well-being
JEL: 
J21
J28
J3
J6
J81
L26
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size
179.63 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.