Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/78666
Authors: 
Åslund, Olof
Nordström Skans, Oskar
Year of Publication: 
2005
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, IFAU - Institute for Labour Market Policy Evaluation 2005:24
Abstract: 
We study ethnic workplace segregation in Sweden using linked employer-employee data covering the entire working-age Swedish population during 1985–2002. Segregation is measured as overexposure to a particular group, taking into account the distribution of human capital, industry and geography. We find considerable workplace segregation between immigrants and natives but the results differ substantially between ethnic groups. Segregation has increased during the period, mainly due to changes in the ethnic composition. Immigrants are particularly overexposed to workers from their own birth region but also to other immigrants. Children to immigrants are only overexposed to immigrants from their parents region of birth. Segregation—particularly in the immigrant-native dimension—is in general negatively correlated with economic status.
Subjects: 
Workplace segregation
ethnic minorities
immigrant assimilation
JEL: 
J15
J23
J42
J62
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.