Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/76247
Authors: 
Schläpfer, Felix
Year of Publication: 
2009
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Socioeconomic Institute, University of Zurich 0917
Abstract: 
Unlike in other disciplines, research output in economics is commonly measured based on the journal titles in which an author has published. Here, I examine how much output measures based on journal titles tell us about the academic interest and relevance of economic papers as measured by citation frequency. Using data from the 2008 Handelsblatt ranking of economists in German speaking countries and interdisciplinary citation data from the Web of Science, I find that researcher scores based on journal titles explain only about one fourth of the variation (variance) in article citations. When the top 10 (20) percent of the researchers according to journal title scores are excluded, the percentage of explained variation in citation frequency drops to 5 (3) percent. These findings empirically confirm the hypothesis that the measures of research output in economics promote narrow and complacent work that is of interest to few, even among an academic audience. They suggest that responsible hiring committees and funding institutions should re-examine existing standards in evaluation and abandon the heavy reliance on journal titles as a measure of individual research output.
Subjects: 
citation index
incentives
publication
research evaluation
scientometrics
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
181.02 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.