Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/75058
Authors: 
Abraham, Filip
Konings, Jozef
Vanormelingen, Stijn
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
LICOS Discussion Paper 181
Abstract: 
In recent years, Europe has witnessed an accelerated process of economic integration. Trade barriers were removed, the euro was introduced and ten new member states have joined the European Union. This paper analyzes how this process of increased economic integration has affected labor and product markets. To this end, we use a panel of Belgian manufacturing firms to estimate price-cost margins and union bargaining power and show how various measures of globalization affect them. Our findings can be summarized as follows: On average, firms set prices about 30% above marginal costs, but there is substantial variation across sectors, with the lowest mark-up around 19% and the highest around 52%. In addition, we find evidence that unions bargain over both wages and employment. We estimate an index of bargaining power, which reflects the fraction of profits that is passed on to workers into higher wages. Depending on the sector, this fraction varies between 6% and 18% and it increases with the markups of firms. Finally, we find that globalization puts pressure on both markups and union bargaining power, especially when there is increased competition from the low wage countries. This suggests that increased globalization is associated with a moderation of wage claims in unionized countries, which should be associated with positive effects on employment.
Subjects: 
Mark-ups
Trade Unions
International Trade
JEL: 
F16
J50
L13
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
250.77 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.