Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/75046
Authors: 
Maertens, Miet
Swinnen, Johan F. M.
Year of Publication: 
2009
Series/Report no.: 
LICOS Discussion Paper 231
Abstract: 
The rapid spread of modern supply chains in developing countries is profoundly changing the way food is produced and traded. In this paper we examine the gender implications in modern supply chains. We conceptualize the various mechanisms through which women are directly affected, we review existing empirical evidence and add new survey-based evidence. Empirical findings from our own survey suggest that modern supply chains may be associated with reduced gender inequalities in rural areas. We find that women benefit more and more directly from large-scale estate production and agro-industrial processing, and the creation of employment in these modern agro-industries than from smallholder contract-firming.
Subjects: 
gender
modern supply chains
vertical coordination
poverty
JEL: 
O12
Q17
J16
J43
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
288.83 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.