Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/74924
Authors: 
Konings, Jozef
Year of Publication: 
2008
Series/Report no.: 
LICOS Discussion Paper 197
Abstract: 
This paper uses longitudinal data of more than 13,000 firms to analyze the effects of on-the-job training on firm level productivity and wages. Workers receiving training are on average more productive than workers not receiving training. This makes firms more productive. On-the-job training increases firm level measured productivity between 1 and 2%, compared to firms that do not provide training. The effect of training on wages is also positive, but much lower than the effect on productivity. Average wages increase only by 0.5%. Sectoral spillovers between firms that train workers are found, but only in firms active in the manufacturing sector. In non-manufacturing no spillovers seem to take place. The results are consistent with recent theories that explain on-the-job training, related to imperfect competition in the labor market, such as monopsony and union bargaining.
Subjects: 
on-the-job-training
productivity
firm level data
monopsony
JEL: 
J01
J24
J42
M53
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
137.52 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.