Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/74885
Authors: 
Verpoorten, Marijke
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
LICOS Discussion Paper 189
Abstract: 
The economic literature has given due attention to household coping strategies in peacetime. In contrast, little is known about such strategies in wartime. This paper studies the use of cattle as a buffer stock by Rwandan households during 1991-2001, a period characterized by civil war and genocide. It is found that the probability of selling cattle increases upon the occurrence of both peacetime and wartime covariant adverse income shocks. The peacetime cattle sales are largely explained by shifts in the household asset portfolio. In contrast, in 1994, the year of the genocide, almost half of the cattle sales were motivated by the need to buy food. However, we argue that the effectiveness of this coping strategy was severely reduced due to the wartime conditions. First, during the year of ethnic violence, cattle prices plummeted to less than half of their pre-genocide value. Second, we find that households most targeted in the violence did not sell cattle. We discuss several explanations for this latter finding.
Subjects: 
Coping Strategies
Buffer Stock Model
Cattle
Violent Conflict
Rwanda
JEL: 
D12
D91
O12
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
398.18 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.