Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/73838
Authors: 
Kauder, Björn
Potrafke, Niklas
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
Ifo Working Paper 159
Abstract: 
In January 2005 the German Supreme Court permitted the state governments to chargetuition fees. By exploiting the natural experiment, we examine how government ideologyinfluenced the introduction of tuition fees. The results show that rightwing governmentswere active in introducing tuition fees. By contrast, leftwing governments strictlydenied tuition fees. This pattern shows clear political alternatives in education policyacross the German states: the political left classifies tuition fees as socially unjust; thepolitical right believes that tuition fees are incentive compatible. By the end of 2014,however, there will be no tuition fees anymore: the political left won four state electionsand abolished tuition fees. In Bavaria the rightwing government also decided to abolishtuition fees because it feared to become elected out of office by adhering to tuition fees.Electoral motives thus explain convergence in tuition fee policy.
Subjects: 
Tuition fees
education policy
government ideology
partisan politics
JEL: 
D72
I22
I28
H75
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.