Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/73523
Authors: 
Michel-Kerjan, Erwann
Raschky, Paul A.
Kunreuther, Howard C.
Year of Publication: 
2009
Series/Report no.: 
Working Papers in Economics and Statistics 2009-10
Abstract: 
This paper tests some existing theories developed over the past 25 years on corporate demand for insurance. Using a unique dataset of 1,809 large U.S. corporations it provides the first empirical analysis that compares corporate demand for standard property insurance and for catastrophe coverage (here, terrorism). We find that larger companies are more likely to have some catastrophe coverage. Corporate demand for catastrophe insurance is found to be more price inelastic than insurance for non-catastrophe risks. This result differs from the findings on individual demand for insurance. The terrorism insurance premium per dollar of coverage is twice as high in the New York Metropolitan area than in the rest of the U.S. Yet the price elasticity of the demand for terrorism insurance is half in this area relative to the rest of the country.
Subjects: 
Corporate decision making
insurance
terrorism
JEL: 
D21
D81
G22
H56
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
285.11 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.