Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/73486
Authors: 
Dutcher, Glenn
Year of Publication: 
2011
Series/Report no.: 
Working Papers in Economics and Statistics 2011-29
Abstract: 
This study examines how employees internalize differences in social distance between themselves and their managers when they are competing for a reward given by the manager. In an employer/employee relationship, this difference in social distance between the employer and the various employees leads to a disadvantageous situation for the socially distant workers when raises, promotions, special considerations etc. are given. Since social distance is present in most organizations, understanding how employees work effort changes in response to changes in social distance is of upmost importance. In prior literature, this disadvantage has always been assumed/shown to lead to lower effort than the advantaged worker. The results partially back up this claim and show that females who are socially distant from their manager contribute much less than females who are socially closer or males regardless of the social distance.
Subjects: 
Experiment
Social distance
JEL: 
C91
C92
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
924.44 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.