Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/73057
Authors: 
Elsayyad, May
Hanafy, Shima'a
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
Joint Discussion Paper Series in Economics 51-2012
Abstract: 
This paper empirically studies the voting outcomes of Egypt's first parliamentary elections after the Arab Spring. In light of the strong Islamist success in the polls, we explore the main determinants of Islamist vs. secular voting. We identify three dimensions that affect voting outcomes at the constituency level: the socio-economic profile, the economic structure and the electoral institutional framework. Our results show that education is negatively associated with Islamist voting. Interestingly, we find significant evidence which suggests that higher poverty levels are associated with a lower vote share for Islamist parties. Later voting stages in the sequential voting setup do not exhibit a bandwagon effect.
Subjects: 
Voting Outcomes
Arab Spring
Political Islam
Sequential Voting
JEL: 
D72
D78
O53
P26
Z12
Z13
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
725.95 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.