Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Kelly, Morgan
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper Series, UCD Centre for Economic Research 05/15
This paper models an industrial revolution as a qualitative transition from a world where innovation is infrequent and haphazard to one where it is continuous and systematic. Pre-industrial innovation is treated as a social process where an individual's effectiveness as an innovator depends on the skills of other individuals in his social network. As technology improves, individuals invest more time in learning through social contact. This gradual increase in linkage formation leads to a sudden change in the size of knowledge networks from small, isolated clusters, to a large connected cluster spanning most of the economy, causing a sudden increase in the effectiveness of innovation: an industrial revolution. The predicted sequence of typical innovators - from gifted amateurs, to lucky amateurs, to professionals - is consistent with empirical evidence.
Industrial revolution
social networks
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
271.83 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.